Arkansaw Traveler - Things from Arkansas. Mostly old things.

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Joe T. Robinson, Out for a Stroll

Posted by drew - February 1st, 2012 Comments 0

This photo from the Library of Congress depicts Joseph Taylor Robinson.

Interesting factoid:

“His response to a guard who questioned his credentials at the 1920 Democratic National Convention was a punch in the face.” -via

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Cotton picker in Pulaski County

Posted by drew - February 1st, 2012 Comments 0

October 1935. Cotton picker in Pulaski County, Arkansas. View full size. 35mm nitrate negative by Ben Shahn for the Farm Security Administration. Via Shorpy

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They are all gone now.

Posted by drew - February 1st, 2012 Comments 1

Via arwriterphotog’s flickr upload:

“This photo was taken in front of their home, which was on Lincoln Avenue in Little Rock. I’m sure the goat and cart did not belong to them, but were photographers props. The children’s father worked for the railroad at the old Little Rock Train Station nearby.

With the passing recently of Frances Muller Quarti (left front) – “The Muller Children” are now all gone. Frances, nicknamed ‘Fruzie,’ William (Bill) in back and to the right, my mother-in-law, Gloria Fontaine Muller Sikes. Gloria was nicknamed Dodie and Jo and I always knew her as “Jo.”

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Miranda Sneed

Posted by drew - January 31st, 2012 Comments 1

Miranda Sneed was apparently born in Washington County, Arkansas in 1809. She was married to Sebron Graham Sneed (1802-1879), a prominent judge, and moved from Washington County to Austin, Texas in 1848. She sat for this portrait in a floral dress with a pink tinted bow, wearing lace gloves and holding a folded fan.

Source: Lawrence T. Jones III Texas Photographs

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Separate but Equal: West Memphis 1948

Posted by drew - January 30th, 2012 Comments 0

west-memphis-schoolhouse-segregated

Life Magazine description:

Large group of mostly African American students in a ramshackle one room schoolhouse.

Location: West Memphis, AR, US
Date taken: June 1948
Photographer: Ed Clark

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Van H. Manning: 3rd Arkansas Infantry Regiment

Posted by drew - January 29th, 2012 Comments 1

Photo by famed civil war photographer Mathew Brady.

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“Manning was held as a prisoner of war by Union forces from the time of his capture until the end of the war. When the war ended, only 144 of his 3rd Arkansas soldiers remained out of 1,353 mustered into it from the start of the war.” via wikipedia

Vannoy Hartrog Manning moved to Arkansas in 1860, where, in January, 1861, he and his wife suffered through the death of their first born son. He was admitted to the Arkansas bar in 1861 and commenced practice in Hamburg.

In May 1861, Manning and Dr. W.H. Tebbs recruited and organized the 3rd Arkansas Infantry Regiment, drawing from soldiers recruited in Ashley, Drew, Union, Dallas and Hot Spring counties. The regiment made up a total of eleven companies, and included one company of recruits from other parts of Arkansas as well as recruits from Tennessee and Kentucky. The regiment was then marched to Vicksburg, Mississippi, where they were initially turned down for service as a part of the Confederate Army.

Manning then enlisted the assistance of Arkansas politician Albert Rust, and the regiment was accepted as part of the Confederate Army, with Rust appointed as colonel, and sent to Lynchburg, Virginia for training. The 3rd Arkansas was then assigned to General Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia, after which it took part in almost every major eastern battle.

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1860 Arkansas Slave Map

Posted by drew - January 29th, 2012 Comments 2

The shading/numbers on each county represent the percentage of the population that were enslaved. Read more about this map.

“The 1860 Census was the last time the federal government took a count of the South’s vast slave population. Several months later, the United States Coast Survey—arguably the most important scientific agency in the nation at the time—issued two maps of slavery that drew on the Census data, the first of Virginia and the second of Southern states as a whole.”

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Mother and Child: Arkansas Flood Refugees of 1937

Posted by drew - January 28th, 2012 Comments 0

May 1937. “Mother and child of Arkansas flood refugee family near Memphis, Texas. These people, with all their earthly belongings, are bound for the lower Rio Grande Valley, where they hope to pick cotton.” Medium-format nitrate negative by Dorothea Lange for the Resettlement Administration. Via Shorpy.

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Learn more:
The Arkansas Flood of 1937 – Encyclopedia of Arkansas History and Culture

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James Fincher’s P-38

Posted by drew - January 27th, 2012 Comments 0

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In the P-38 Fighter Bomber called the ‘Arkansas Traveler’, Mr. Fincher saw action like few people ever will. Video interviews and extended photo gallery from AETN’s “In Their Words”..

“Arkansas Traveler” (H5-U)
P-38J-20-LO Lightning
s/n 44-23511
392nd FS, 367th FG, 9th AF
Assigned to 1st Lt. James O. Fincher
Taken on October 12,1944 at Clastres,France (A-71).
Via Flickr

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Little Rock – 1958: People Walked

Posted by drew - January 26th, 2012 Comments 0

View Full Size. A 1958 scene from Capitol Avenue, downtown Little Rock.
via The Library of Congress

Creator(s): O’Halloran, Thomas J., photographer
Date Created/Published: 1958 Sept. 17.
Summary: Photograph shows a city street in Little Rock, Arkansas, with people walking, shops, cars and buses, and the state capitol in the background.

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Mississippi River Meander Map

Posted by drew - January 25th, 2012 Comments 0

During the late ’30s and early ’40s, Dr. Howard Fisk researched 750 square miles of the lower Mississippi Valley looking at historical records to determine how the river has changed over the last 1,000 years.

Working under contract with the Army Corps of Engineers, he painstakingly documented where the river had flowed and color coded the channels.

Want better images?

High Res version showing entire Arkansas border
You can also download the entire report, and all the maps at 300-dpi print resolution, direct from the Army Corps of Engineers.

Via Radical Cartography

Categories: maps.

Thief in a Carriage – 1900

Posted by drew - January 25th, 2012 Comments 0

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Scene: Arlington Hotel, Hot Springs, Arkansas.Image info: Written on back: Adam Worth, the famous thief, sits facing the Pinkerton brothers. He is the small figure on front seat.

Learn more about Adam Worth, (1844–January 8, 1902) an American criminal. Scotland Yard detective Robert Anderson nicknamed him “the Napoleon of the criminal world”, and he is commonly referred to as “the Napoleon of Crime”.

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Uprooted Cherry Picking Arkansan: 1940

Posted by drew - January 25th, 2012 Comments 0

View Full Size. July 1940. Berrien County, Michigan. “Migrant mother of family from Arkansas in roadside camp of cherry pickers.” Via Shorpy

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Video: Arkansas / Arkansaw: A State and It’s Reputation

Posted by drew - January 23rd, 2012 Comments 0

“This episode of the Old State House Museum Collection podcast deals with our most current exhibit, Arkansas / Arkansaw : A State and Its Reputation. We feature an interview with the curator of the exhibit, Dr. Brooks Blevins, a professor of Ozark Studies at Missouri State University. Through his research and book commissioned by the Old State House, Dr. Blevins explores the origins of the states image as a backwards hillbilly state.”

Part Two

Part Three

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“Big Rock” of North Little Rock

Posted by drew - January 22nd, 2012 Comments 0

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Source: 1892 Arkansas World’s Fair Directory

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